The W. J. Eccles Prize is awarded annually to the graduate student judged to have presented the best paper at the Society’s Annual Meeting. The Prize honors the memory of William John Eccles (1917-1998), a distinguished historian of French Canada and an outstanding supporter of graduate students. The Prize was created by Bill Eccles’s FCHS colleagues to continue his work by encouraging those at the beginning of their careers in our field. From 2000 to 2018, the Prize was awarded to the best article published in French Colonial History by a graduate student or recent post-graduate scholar.

Application Procedures

Graduate student presenters at the annual meeting should submit an electronic copy of their paper to the editor of French Colonial History, Dr. Kenneth Orosz oroszkj@buffalostate.edu immediately following the meeting. Session chairs are urged to encourage graduate student members of their panels to submit their papers.

Eccles Prize Winners

Best Paper Presented by a Graduate Student at the Annual Meeting, 2019-

Best Article Published in French Colonial History by a Graduate Student or Recent Ph.D., 2000-2018
2011
Christine Mussard (Université de Provence), “Une décolonisation par défaut : les mouvements migratoires des colons de l’Algérie vers la Tunisie – cas de Lacroix, centre de colonisation de la commune mixte de La Calle (1920 – 1950),” French Colonial History 13 (2012), pp.55-72.

2010
Aline Demay (Université de Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne), “Saigon: une métropole touristique?” French Colonial History 12 (2011), pp. 123-142.

2009
M. Kathryn Edwards (University of Toronto), “Traître au colonialisme? The Georges Boudarel Affair and the Memory of the Indochina War.” French Colonial History 11 (2010), pp. 193-210.

2008
Marie Rodet (University of Vienna), “‘Le délit d’abandon du domicile conjugal’ ou l’invasion du pénal colonial dans les jugements des “tribunaux indigènes” au Soudan Français (1900-1947),” French Colonial History 10 (2009), pp. 151-169.

2006
Reine-Claude Grondin (Université de Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne), “L’Empire palimpseste : l’exemple des années trente dans le Limousin,” French Colonial History 7 (2006), pp. 165-180.

Honorable Mention: Thomas Peace (York University), “Deconstructing the Sauvage/Savage in the Writing of Samuel de Champlain and Captain John Smith,” French Colonial History 7 (2006), pp. 1-20.

2005
Michelle Cheyne (Rutgers University), “Pyracmond, ou les Creoles : L’articulation d’une hierarchie des roles raciaux sur la scene francaise sous la Restauration,” French Colonial History 6 (2005), pp.79-102.

2004
Benoît Grenier (Université Laval), “‘Nulle terre sans seigneur?’ Une étude comparative de la présence seigneuriale (France-Canada), XVIIe-XIXe siècle,” French Colonial History 5 (2004), pp.7-24.

Ibra Sene (Michigan State University), “Colonisation française et main-d’oeuvre carcérale au Sénégal: De l’emploi des détenus des camps penaux sur les chantiers des travaux routiers (1927-1940),” French Colonial History 5 (2004), pp.153-171.

2003
Spencer Segalla, “Georges Hardy and Educational Ethnology in French Morocco, 1920-1926.” French Colonial History 4 (2003) pp. 171-190. Spencer Segalla was a doctoral student at Stony Brook University when the prize was awarded.

The William Shorrock Travel Award is presented annually to help defray travel costs for graduate students presenting papers at the French Colonial Historical Society’s annual meeting. In addition to being a long time member and past President of the society, Bill Shorrock was a passionate supporter of graduate students. This award honors his memory and continues his work as a mentor by providing travel assistance to those just beginning their careers in the field of French colonial history.

Application Procedures

When submitting their completed paper or panel proposals for the annual meeting, graduate students wishing to be considered for the Shorrock Travel Award must also furnish the program committee with an estimated budget of travel expenses (including other anticipated sources of funding) and a brief statement formally applying for the award. Please note that all participants in the annual meeting must be members in good standing of the Society.

William Shorrock Travel Award Winners

2019
Michaela Kleber, “Native Women Order the Disorder in French Illinois”

Deirdre T Lyons, “’We are Free, We Marry,’ They Say: Republican Emancipation and Marriage in the French Antilles, 1848-1852”

2018
Kevin Li, “The Ambiguous Résistants: The Bình Xuyên as Patriotic Collaborators during the First Indochina War”

Samuel Dersken, “‘It is indispensable that our Indian tribes be provided with their accustomed goods’: Liquor and Social Power in the Pays des Illinois, 1750-1803”

Elizabeth Jacob, “‘This Matter Can Only Be Settled with 10,000 Deaths’: Land, Labor, and Violence in Colonial Côte d’Ivoire”

Elyssa Gage, “Writing and Rewriting Ourika: The Black Woman, Integration, and the Colonial Project”

Aziza Doudou, “Fragmentations identitaires des soldats marocains durant la guerre d’Indochine”

Pauline Moskowski-Ouargli, “L’impact de la migration des femmes dans la construction de l’espace colonial français au XVIIIème siècle. Le cas des femmes des réseaux coloniaux à Bordeaux”

2017
Caroline Séquin, “Fermeture des maisons de tolérance et sexualité interraciale dans le Dakar d’après-guerre”

John Boonstra, “Proclaiming Allegiance and Promising Protection: Affective Discourses and Debates over Intervention between France and Lebanon during the Great War”

2016
Melody Shum, “Colonial Childhood in French Kwang Chow Wan (1930’s-1940’s)”

Adrienne Tyrey, “Separate but Equal? Arab vs Berber Education under the French Protectorate of Morocco, and the Case of Arabic at the Collège berbère d’Azrou”

2014
Amandine Dabat, “Contourner l’exil : les réseaux de communication de l’empereur vietnamien Hàm Nghi (1871-1944) entre l’Algérie française et l’Indochine”

Isabelle Flour, “Casting Angkor: Reconstructing Khmer Architecture at the Musée Indochinois and Universal Expositions in France (1867-1937)”

2012
Michelle Pinto, “Africanization in the Postwar French Empire: Concept and Program for Modernization”

Claire Edington, “Mettray Overseas: Juvenile Justice Reform Between France and Indochina, 1905-1945″

The French Colonial Historical Society awards the Boucher Prize in honor of long term members and active supporters, Mary Alice and Philip Boucher, annually recognizing the the best volume published in the preceding year dealing with the French colonial experience from the 16th century to 1815.

Books from any academic discipline will be considered, providing that they approach the French colonial experience from a historical perspective.

The deadline for this year’s submissions is March 1, 2021. Questions about the submission process should be addressed to Dr. Charles Keith, Chair of the FCHS Book Prize Committee, at ckeith@msu.edu.

Applicants or their publishers should submit four copies of books published in 2020 (date of publication is determined by the copyright page of the book), one to each of the book prize committee members at the addresses listed below.

Please indicate clearly that the submission is for the Boucher Prize.

  • Dr. Charles Keith
    Department of History
    Michigan State University
    211 Old Horticulture Hall
    506 E. Circle Drive
    East Lansing, MI 48824 USA
  • Dr. Ellen Amster
    Department of History
    McMaster University
    Chester New Hall Room 616
    1280 Main Street West
    Hamilton, ON L8S 4L9 Canada
  • Dr. Robert Michael Morrissey
    Department of History
    University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
    309 Gregory Hall
    810 Wright Street
    Urbana, IL 61801 USA
  • Dr. Elizabeth Heath
    27 Earle Lane
    Princeton, NJ 08540 USA

The winner of the Boucher Prize is announced at the annual conference of the French Colonial Historical Society.

2020 Boucher Book Prize Winner

Sophie White, Voices of the Enslaved: Love, Labor, and Longing in French Louisiana (UNC Press/Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture)

Sophie White’s Voices of the Enslaved: Love, Labor, and Longing in French Louisiana is the winner of this year’s Mary Alice and Philip Boucher prize.  Voices of the Enslaved offers a major contribution to an emerging scholarship devoted to the recovery of subaltern and enslaved voices and experiences in the French Atlantic world. White’s innovative and creative use of court records as sources with which to capture the intimate and affective lives of Louisiana’s enslaved enriches and deepens our understanding of slavery at the level of the everyday. Careful reading of the fleeing and fragmented testimonies offered by the enslaved in these court cases, White argues, offers an opportunity to piece together what were effectively autobiographies offered by the enslaved. Ever attentive to the way the power structures shaped these testimonies, White nevertheless shows how enslaved men and women used the opportunity afforded by court testimony to tell their own stories and experiences in their own words, thereby allowing scholars a way to recover the lives of ordinary, unexceptional individuals who lived, loved, toiled, and pieced together families and relationships all under the yoke of slavery. Through meticulous analysis of the details and references offered by the enslaved in these testimonies and her deft skill in weaving together textual, visual, and material sources, White crafts a series of rich microhistories through which she retells the everyday experience of enslavement at the crossroads of the Caribbean, Atlantic, and American empires. Beautifully written, it is a tour de force of archival detective work, a vivid portrayal of power and resistance, and a moving reflection on the importance of amplifying unheard historical voices.

Honorable Mention:
Céline Carayon, Eloquence Embodied: Nonverbal Communication among French and Indigenous Peoples in the Americas (UNC Press/Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture)

Boucher Prize Past Winners

2019
Jean-François Lozier, Flesh Reborn: The Saint Lawrence Valley Mission Settlements through the Seventeenth Century (McGill-Queens University Press)

2018
Sue Peabody, Madeline’s Children: Family, Freedom, Secrets, and  Lies in France’s Indian Ocean Colonies(Oxford University Press, 2017)

2017
Jennifer L. Palmer, Intimate Bonds: Family and Slavery in the French Atlantic (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016)

2016
Julia Gaffield, Haitian Connections in the Atlantic World. Recognition after Revolution (University of North Carolina Press)

2015
Christian Ayne Crouch, Nobility Lost: French and Canadian Martial Cultures, Indians, and the End of New France (Cornell University Press)

2014
Rebecca Rogers, A Frenchwoman’s Imperial Story: Madame Luce in Nineteenth Century Algeria (Stanford University Press)

2013
Brett Rushforth, Bonds of Alliance: Indigenous and Atlantic Slaveries in New France (University of North Carolina Press, for the Omohondro Institute of Early American History and Culture, Williamsburg, Virginia)

2012
Jennifer Sessions, By Sword and Plow: France and the Conquest of Algeria (Cornell University Press)

The French Colonial Historical Society awards the Heggoy prize in honor of founding member, Alf Andrew Heggoy, annually in recognition of the best volume published in the preceding year dealing with the French colonial experience from 1815 to the present*.

Books from any academic discipline will be considered, providing that they approach the French colonial experience from a historical perspective.

The deadline for this year’s submissions is March 1, 2021. Questions about the submission process should be addressed to Dr. Charles Keith, Chair of the FCHS Book Prize Committee, at ckeith@msu.edu.

Applicants or their publishers should submit four copies of books published in 2020 (date of publication is determined by the copyright page of the book), one to each of the book prize committee members at the addresses listed below.

Please indicate clearly that the submission is for the Heggoy Book Prize.

  • Dr. Charles Keith
    Department of History
    Michigan State University
    211 Old Horticulture Hall
    506 E. Circle Drive
    East Lansing, MI 48824 USA
  • Dr. Ellen Amster
    Department of History
    McMaster University
    Chester New Hall Room 616
    1280 Main Street West
    Hamilton, ON L8S 4L9 Canada
  • Dr. Robert Michael Morrissey
    Department of History
    University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
    309 Gregory Hall
    810 Wright Street
    Urbana, IL 61801 USA
  • Dr. Elizabeth Heath
    27 Earle Lane
    Princeton, NJ 08540 USA

The winner of the Heggoy Prize is announced at the annual conference of the French Colonial Historical Society.

*Prior to the inauguration of the Boucher Prize in 2012 the Society awarded the Heggoy prize to the best book on French Colonial history covering any era.

2020 Alf Andrew Heggoy Book Prize Winner

Joshua Cole, Lethal Provocation: The Constantine Murders and the Politics of French Algeria (Cornell University Press)

Lethal Provocation is the definitive account of a defining event in French colonial history.  For too long, the 1934 sectarian violence in French-ruled Constantine has been explained away as a manifestation of timeless and irreducible tensions between Algeria’s Jewish and Muslim populations. But in this magnificently researched and luminously written book, Joshua Cole places these events at the very heart of the modern history of Greater France. Moving seamlessly between a range of historical registers, Cole offers at once a history of religious life under French colonial rule, a portrait of socio-cultural change in a transforming colonial city, an analysis of the intersections of metropolitan and colonial politics in the 1930s, and a granular reconstruction of the events worthy of a great criminologist. Lethal Provocation will remain a classic in French colonial studies for decades to come.

Honorable Mention:
Claire Edington, Beyond the Asylum: Mental Illness in French Colonial Vietnam (Cornell University Press)

Alf Andrew Heggoy Prize Past Winners

2019
Bonnie Effros, Incidental Archaeologists: French Officers and the Rediscovery of Roman North Africa (Cornell University Press)

2018
Christopher Church, Paradise Destroyed: Catastrophe and Citizenship in the French Caribbean (University of Nebraska Press)

2017
Caroline Herbelin, Architectures du Vietnam Colonial. Repenser le métissage (CTHS-INHA)

2016
Emily Burrill, States of Marriage: Gender, Justice, and Rights in Colonial Mali (Ohio University Press)

2015
Elizabeth Heath, Wine, Sugar, and the Making of Modern France: Global Economic Crisis and the Racialization of French Citizenship, 1870-1910 (Cambridge University Press)

2014
Elizabeth A. Foster, Faith in Empire: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Rule in French Empire (Stanford University Press)

2013
Charles Keith, Catholic Vietnam: A Church from Empire to Nation (University of California Press)

2012
Daniel J. Sherman, French Primitivism and the Ends of Empire, 1945-1975 (University of Chicago Press)

2011
Julia A. Clancy-Smith, Mediterraneans: North Africa and Europe in an Age of Migration, C. 1800-1900 (University of California Press)

2010
Jay Gitlin, Bourgeois Frontier: French Towns, French Traders & American Expansion (Yale University Press)

2009
Kenneth Orosz, Religious Conflict and the Evolution of Language Policy in German and French Cameroon, 1885-1939 (Peter Lang/American University Studies)

2008
Emma Anderson, The Betrayal of Faith: The Tragic Journey of a Colonial Native Convert (Harvard University Press)

2007
J.P. Daughton, An Empire Divided: Religion, Republicanism, and the Making of French Colonialism, 1880-1914 (New York: Oxford, 2006)

2006
Megan Vaughan, Creating the Creole Island: Slavery in Eighteenth-century Mauritius (Duke University Press)

2005
Londa Schiebinger, Plants and Empire: Colonial Bioprospecting in the Atlantic World (Harvard University Press)

2004
Christelle Taraud, La prostitution coloniale (Éditions Payot)

2003
Ken Banks, Chasing Empire across the Sea (McGill/Queens University Press)

2002
Eric Jennings, Vichy in the Tropics (Stanford University Press)

2001
Peter Moogk, La Nouvelle France (Michigan State University Press)

2000
Joe Lunn, Memoirs of the Maelstrom (Greenwood)

1998
Leslie Choquette, Frenchmen into Peasants (Harvard University Press)

1997
Tanis C. Thorne, The Many Hands of my Relations (University of Missouri Press)

1996
Phyllis Martin, Leisure and Society in Colonial Brazzaville (Cambridge University Press)

1995
Julia Clancy-Smith, Rebel and Saint: Muslim Notables, Populist Protest, Colonial Encounters (Algeria and Tunisia, 1800-1914) (University of California Press)

1994
R. David Edmunds and Joe Peyser, The Fox Wars: The Mesquakie Challenge to New France (University of Oklahoma Press)

1993
Philip Boucher, Cannibal Encounters (Johns Hopkins University Press)

1992
Doug Porch, The French Foreign Legion (Harper Collins)

1991
Serge Courville, Entre ville et campagne. L’essor du village dans les seigneuries du Bas-Canada (Presses de l’Université Laval)

1990
Christopher Harrison, France and Islam in West Africa (Cambridge)

1989
Bill Shorrock, From Ally to Enemy (Kent State University Press)

1988
Carl Brasseaux, The Founding of New Acadia (Louisiana State University Press)

1987
Carl Ekberg, Colonial Sainte-Genevieve (Patrice Press)

1986
John Hargreaves, West Africa Partitioned. Vol. 2, The Elephants and the Grass (University of Wisconsin Press)

1985
Bill Hoisington, The Casablanca Connection (U. North Carolina Press)

1981
Bill Cohen, The French Encounter with Africans (Indiana U. Press)

1977
Cornelius Jaenen, Friend and Foe (Columbia University Press)